Not that

New sock
Not that but this!

There is a computer service known as IFTTT which allows users to write simple little commands which their computer will action automatically under certain circumstances. The initials stand for If This Then That. An example would be If an e-mail arrives from Harry then move it to the Harry folder. It makes sense because this type of thinking is hard-wired into the human brain – If the sun is just above the horizon then it is early morning or late evening; If the rain comes then the crops will grow. Routines, which I wrote about at the beginning of the week, are often based on the IFTTT scenario.

So what does this concept have to do with the knitting in my photo? Well, the knitting leads me to propose a different concept – NTBT. Not That But This. My photo is clearly not a progress update on the sleeve of the Basilica cardigan which I had just started in my previous blog post. I didn’t get more than a few rows of that completed before realising that this is not the time to be embarking on a complicated pattern. This is the time for sock knitting (enter sock wool, stage left).

I grabbed a ball of Opal Sport Exclusiv out of my stash and made a start. I am enjoying the gentle greens and greys of this yarn’s colourway, so soothing on the soul (oh, wait, should that be the sole?), green being a calming colour. It isn’t quite as soft as the sock wools I normally use, being a blend of 60% wool/25% polypropylene/15% polyamide, but it’s what I had on hand and I’m keen to use up some old yarns. I have a further three lots of sock yarn which I’ll try to get knitted up over the next couple of months, all from West Yorkshire Spinners – a plain grey which may be too boring to knit, but we’ll see; a grey with cream and brown; and a grey with cream and red.

The big change that is coming up is my return to full-time work after a year without a formal job. Between that and knowing that I want to keep aside plenty of time to pursue my creative writing, I anticipate that my knitting production will slow down significantly for the next few months. My main plan for the autumn is to minimise my yarn stash and tidy up the storage in my knitting cabinet, which currently looks like this:

Knitting cabinet
Not exactly inspiring

I’m not sure if I have talked about this piece of furniture before, but it is a music cabinet which belonged to my maternal grandfather who gave music lessons after he retired. One of our favourite parts of our grandparents’ large Edwardian terraced house in York was his Music Room which was on the first floor (upstairs from the ground floor, this being an English house). The bottom part of the cabinet swings downwards to about 45º and I have some knitting patterns stored there, but that area isn’t being used as well as it could be. The real bugbear for me are the Rowan magazines. These are all issues that I love and don’t want to get rid of, but the size makes them difficult to store effectively.

Once the yarns and storage are sorted out, I think my next garment will be the big pink jumper of my dreams. I will have to order wool for that and I don’t want to start it until I am more comfortable about the amount of time my new job will leave for knitting.

So these are my meandering thoughts for a Friday morning. I have a busy weekend of Grandparenting to enjoy before I start work on Monday. Exciting times. I hope that you are all looking forward to the weekend.

Mend me, baby, one more time

29-05-19 socks
Old striped socks with new plain grey ‘toe’ added

Okay, well, a Britney Spears reference may not be quite what we were expecting today, but she’ll do.

After posting last week about the whole sock-mending option not working for me, I took a second look at the four pairs that that I had set aside to do some repair work on. I gave the whole structure of each sock a more thorough check to see whether there was enough potential to make the repairs. It was encouraging to find that three pairs probably are still in good condition and should be repairable, although one pair definitely isn’t.

I worked on the pair which had the least wear and was therefore in a state where it would be relatively simple to knit a replacement toe. I have finished the work now and I am very pleased to say that it was a success – these socks should be good for another couple of years. For the time being I have put them away as they are an autumn/winter/spring weight and I won’t be wearing them through the summer months. Over the summer I will try to mend the other two pairs in a similar fashion.

When I had finished mending this pair of socks and composed my scheme for mending the other two pairs, I was feeling pleased with myself. Then yesterday I felt an ominous twang at the back of my neck, so I took off my cardigan and this had happened. Yikes!

29-05-19 cardi
It’s a broken neck! Not that I want to over-dramatise anything,

This is an old cardigan which I have been wearing since 2012 – the pattern is Laccaria by Norah Gaughan and I knitted it in J C Rennie Shetland wool holding two strands together to get a DK/Worstead gauge. (I find it quite odd that I don’t have any finished object photos of this project at all.)

Now, if this problem had cropped up in May last year I would have cut the buttons off and thrown the cardigan in the bin, which may sound extreme, but at that point I had marked it down as no longer wearable. I had become too plump for it – the sleeves would spot-weld themselves to my arms when I wore it; one of the buttonholes had grown to the point where the button simply would not stay shut; the whole cardigan was shabby. However, as I have lost weight this cardigan has regained favour with me to the point where I am not ready to let it go. So, more mending is in order – I’m pretty sure I still have a ball of this wool and can just unpick the cast-off edge of the neckband and re-do it. I want to knit a new garment in this type of colour and when I do that, it will be time to retire this one.

Do you find there are times when everything seems to need mending, or is it just a steady trickle in your life?


 

Finished object – Isambard Socks

15-05-19 complete socks

I had a bit of a knitting frenzy over the weekend and finished my Isambard socks. I have small feet and my socks don’t take long to knit if I work on them consistently. I love seeing all the amazing sock patterns that other people knit, but I only like knitting plain ones myself. I have no idea why that should be unless it is because I love my socks to be wildly coloured or have tons of variegation and those type of yarns just don’t play nicely with patterning. Or perhaps I am just lazy (actually, no perhaps needed there).

I have been knitting my socks for the past couple of years on 2.5mm needles, but I am coming to the conclusion that I might go down to 2.25mm for my next pair. I think I used 2.25mm when I first started knitting socks and they lasted rather better than my more recent socks, not that the more recent socks are problematic in any way.

I really enjoy how this wool knits up and the dyeing is very pleasing to the eye. Those blues and golds on the grey-beige background make me very happy.

Technical details:

Pattern:  Vanilla sock based on free pattern circa 2006/2007, came free with a ball of sock wool
Size: To fit UK size 4 1/2 shoe
Materials: Mr B sock yarn 75% superwash wool/25% nylon, 100g (I usually use around 55g)
Needles:  2.5mm KnitPro Zing metal double-point needles, 20cm long, pack of 5 (I use 4 with half the stitches on one needle, and a quarter each on a further two needles, working the live stitches onto the fourth needle)

The pattern I follow has a heel flap and gusset construction which suits me very well. The toe in the pattern is pretty standard, decreasing equal amounts on both sides until 12 stitches remain on both needles, then doing a Kitchener Stitch join. I learned how to do the Kitchener join using the knitting needles instead of having to thread up a tapestry needle and that made a lot of sense to me. However, last year I discovered the Barn Toe which gives a slightly deeper and more rounded toe shape and I like that a lot so I used it on this pair.

15-05-19 barn toe

I particularly enjoy the fact that with this toe shaping you just keep decreasing until you only have four stitches left and then you cinch them shut using the end of your working yarn. It is so quick to do and there’s none of that inclination to stop just short of the end because you need to look up the Kitchener instructions again.

As well as finishing these, I have made significant progress on my Inigo cardigan. I have all-but completed the back and have made a start on one of the sleeves. I thought, as my gauge is not exactly as per the pattern, it made sense to wait to finish the armhole shaping on the back until I had a sleeve complete so I can make sure that the pieces fit together well. Forethought – that’s a new one for me!

Whilst I was working on the Gaudi cardigan I logged it on Ravelry. I have been very lazy about Ravelry for quite a number of years, rarely using it and not logging any of my projects, although there was a time when I was quite diligent with it. Now I am suddenly getting back into using it to keep the project details and I am enjoying it once again.

There has been one drawback to my knitting endeavours this past week, which is that one of my fingers has developed a slightly alarming ‘click’. I have consulted Dr. Internet who informs me this is “trigger finger” (sounds like it is a surfeit of Kojak rather than knitting that has caused it) and since I am not in pain and my finger merely feels odd rather than actually seizing up, I am limiting the amount I work on my knitting for a few days to give it a rest.

I hope you have enjoyed seeing my finished socks and I hope your knitting, or other creative endeavours, are going well. For now, I think it’s time to have a nice cup of tea.


 

New on the needles

08-05-19 apple pie
Is it an alien planet? No, it’s an apple pie!

It is a miserable day in Norfolk today with a curtain of rain plunging down from a sky that hasn’t had the heart to brighten for one moment since dawn. The kind of day when you just need to sit on the settee with your knitting and only get up to bake apple pie. I usually make pie in a deeper dish, but decided to go for what my mum would call a ‘plate apple pie’ and jolly good it is too. I think it would only be improved if I had a Lego astronaut that I could pose on top to pretend it was a photo of an alien planet.

I had a couple of days not knitting when I finished Gaudi and then I cast on a pair of socks as a quick palate-cleanser before heading into another garment. I had a ball of Mr B Yarns’ sock wool in the colourway Isambard ready to go and I got a reasonable amount of the first sock knitted before being hit with the urge to knit another cardigan. The sock is my usual plain vanilla on 60 stitches using 2.5mm needles.

08-05-19 on needles
Vanilla sock, and the beginning of Inigo by Lisa Richardson

The cardigan is Inigo, a design by Lisa Richardson for Rowan Yarns from the New Vintage DK pattern book, just like the Gaudi cardigan. When I bought the book at the tail end of last year, I knew there were a number of garments I wanted to make from it. This pattern is designed using Rowan Cashmere Tweed, but I am using Sublime Luxurious Tweed DK which is a departure for me because it is a mix of 60% wool and 40% cotton. I think this will make a nice summer cardigan with the cotton content whilst the wool makes it more comfortable to work with than a lot of cotton yarns.

I am currently at the point where I will start to increase stitches from the waist to bust, but it hasn’t been a smooth ride getting here. I am going to confess that I didn’t knit a gauge swatch, just went straight into the garment cold in a yarn I have never used before because clearly my life isn’t exciting enough! I cast on using the recommended 4mm needles and the second-smallest size (91-97cm/36-38″ bust). When I finished the moss stitch hem I thought it looked wider than I would want, so I unpicked it and started again on the smallest size (81-86cm/32-34″ bust). I knitted about 4″ on that then measured my gauge and found I was getting 20 stitches to 10cm where the pattern calls for 22 stitches. I really liked the fabric at that gauge, and enjoyed actually knitting it, but I decided to start over again knitting the second-smallest size with 3.75mm needles to see how that would go. I got to the end of the decreases into the waist on that attempt, but found even one size smaller needles made the knitting much tougher on the hands and I wasn’t quite so keen on the slightly denser fabric it produced.. I would have persevered with it, but I had somehow lost a stitch in the decreasing and couldn’t find where I had made my mistake. That was enough to convince me to return to the original plan to make the smallest size on the 4mm needles and I am glad I did. What you see in the photos has all been knitted today so it is going pretty quickly.

08-05-19 close-up

I really like the pattern for this little jacket-style cardigan, plain and simple it will be just the thing to pull on through the summer. I don’t think I have knitted any of Lisa Richardson’s patterns before, but I have often seen her designs in the Rowan magazines and long been a fan of her design aesthetic which often leans slightly towards the vintage.

I hope you have better weather than us today and, if not, that you have been able to spend a little time doing something you love to bring a little cheer to the gloom.


Many thanks to my sister for donating the lovely Sublime yarn to me when she was de-stashing.


 

There’s a hole in my….

03-04-19 socks
…. Sock!

I doubt that this photo is a vast revelation amongst sock knitters. It’s just a hand-knit sock with a hole worn into it. It is slightly unusual for me, because in every other instance except, I think, one, my socks have developed holes at my big toe, not on the ball of my foot as this one has.

I am not sad about this development and I must make it quite clear I have no intention of trying to salvage the socks, mend them, or re-purpose them. I am happily going to wave goodbye to them and send them to the great sock drawer in the sky because they have been my number one worst-fitting pair of socks. For years! Why would I keep badly-fitting socks for years, you may ask. I ask myself the same question and I don’t know the answer. It isn’t as if I have had them unused in my sock stash; I have worn them very regularly, yet every time I have been struck by how poorly they fit.

I think part of the problem is I didn’t knit them long enough in the foot in the first place. I also think that over the years they have shrunk with repeated washing which has only exacerbated the problem. I clearly didn’t ever think much of these socks because I have totally failed to record their details anywhere. I don’t recall when I knitted them, or what yarn I used. I think it was a yarn with silk in it because I can remember thinking it might not be particularly good for socks but there was nothing else I wanted to use it for.

I decided to record their demise to make up for the total lack of regard I had for them during their life, and to note that even the projects we don’t adore can have useful lives. Despite everything, these socks regularly kept my feet warm and so, as Marie Kondo advises, I have said thank you to them and slung them in the bin!

The most exciting thing about this process is that I now have a legitimate reason to knit another pair of socks to replace them.


Have you ever continued to use a hand-made item that you aren’t happy with, just because it’s not quite bad enough to dispose of?


 

Finished object – Kingfisher in Fangorn Forest Socks

 

 

I finished knitting my socks on Sunday and I’m really pleased with them. This is the first project I have both cast on and finished in 2019, and my second completed item this year, which is admirable progress.

First off, I want to say how very happy I was with the yarn for this project. It is Noodle Soup Yarns’ MCN Luxe sock yarn in the Spooky Smog colourway from last autumn. This is a 3-ply sock yarn comprising 80% superwash Merino, 10% Cashmere, 10% nylon. It comes in at 350m/382 yards per 100g skein, which indicates that it is rather thicker than a standard sock yarn and that has resulted in a nice squooshy fabric. It can be machine-washed at 30º which is how I generally wash my socks anyway, although I understand they may survive longer if they are hand-washed.

The colour of the yarn is just amazing, deep and rich, and slightly brooding. It is not quite my all-time favourite colour combination, but it’s close. My favourite combination is one I think of as “bruise” – greens and blues and pinky-purples and a tiny bit more washed-out than this deep shade. I want to note that whilst I was knitting I didn’t find the colour coming off on my hands, an experience I have had with some other hand-dyed yarns in deep colourways. Personally, I love how the colours have ended up spiralling around these socks.

The pattern is just a plain old vanilla sock using the instructions I have had since I first started knitting socks in the “olden days” (this covers anything more than ten years/two jobs ago). I have tweaked it by replacing the standard wedge toe with the “barn toe” as I find this slightly deeper variation suits my feet well. I made these socks a good length, as befits thicker socks that will be welcome in colder weather, and I ended up with 26g of the wool left over. This should make toes for at least one, maybe two more pairs of socks.

I always knit my socks using four double-point 20cm needles. I cast on 60 stitches, with 15 stitches on each of two needles for the back of the leg and foot, and 30 stitches on a third needle for the front. This makes it a cinch to know exactly where you are on a round of knitting, and I find it makes working the sock very easy. Probably because I am so used to knitting this way, when I do try to use circular needles and a magic loop method, or even the two circular needles method, it just seems unnecessarily complex.

So now all that is left is to wash them (I always wash my knits on completion) and pop them in the sock drawer. Should be ready for the cold snap we’re expecting over the weekend.

Next up, it’s back to the Gaudi jumper, which in my mind is getting more and more modified as the days go by. I need to complete the back of it, which shouldn’t take too long now the socks are done.


 

Knits in progress as December wanes

Hello again, nice to have you back with me for an update on my current knits. I am not being a monogamous knitter at the moment, which is rather out of character as you know. I must admit this causes me a tiny bit of concern as I don’t think I will make progress on everything and I hate to leave things in abeyance.

The “old gold” wool

You may recall before Christmas I was having a dither over whether to continue knitting the Rimini cardigan by Martin Storey with this 4-ply yarn, or to abandon that and knit a thicker jumper holding two or three stands of yarn together. Well, I tried a thicker jumper and didn’t really like it so I reverted to the fine-knit cardigan which I know I will wear. However, what with the Christmas knitting and the dithering, it was clear I would not be finishing the project before Christmas so I decided to put it on hold, probably until the spring.

The “Dr Foster Went To Gloucester” socks

Another thing you may recall is that I knitted one sock out of this lovely Mr B Yarns wool back in September. I went completely out of my comfort zone and knitted it toe-up, incorporating the delightfully-titled Fleegle Heel and was very happy with it at the time, and in no doubt that I would knit the other sock when I’d finished… (insert whatever seems appropriate!).

I didn’t ever knit that second sock, but I thought knitting it would be the ideal project to fill in the time before I did my Christmas cast-on of the project I really wanted to work on. However, as soon as I tried on the sock I’d finished, I knew I wasn’t going to complete them. I had reverted to type and was dreadfully unhappy with everything about the toe-up construction. Luckily, I have small feet, and one 100g skein of yarn can more than adequately provide me with three socks, so I simply cast on a relatively plain, cuff-down sock. I experimented with the idea of doing a short row heel rather than my normal heel flap and gusset, but after two attempts I gave up on that too and went with what makes me happy.  So here is my progress to date – a HO:-

28-12-18 Dr Foster HO
Dr Foster Went To Gloucester – still love this colourway

I have decided these will be my New Year Socks, so I had better get the second one knitted over this weekend.

The Gaudi caridgan by Martin Storey

I had promised myself through December that I would cast on for the Gaudi cardigan once my pre-Christmas socialising was done and so I sat down in the calm of Christmas Eve and made a start. This is how far I have got – to the waist of the back:-

28-12-18 Gaudi progress
Halfway up the back of the Gaudi cardigan

I love this pattern so much. I love the colours and the fact they change regularly makes for a more interesting knit. The only thing I don’t like quite so much is the Rowan Felted Tweed wool. Oh, I love how it looks, I just don’t like the fact that it incorporates alpaca. I am not a fan of alpaca and every time I use it, I experience a twinge of regret. A nice Shetland wool would give the same look and, in my opinion, a much nicer knitting experience, so I will note that for my future edification.

Not that I’m going to allow that little carp to put me off this project! I intend to make steady progress on this garment and get it finished quickly enough to keep me warm through February and March which are often the colder months in my part of the world. I reckon so long as I do a few rows each day, it will be done before I know it! Shame that I completely failed to do a few rows yesterday (my excuse is that I had some work to do on an item for my Etsy shop and that was more important).

Today

So, for today my plan is to cast on the second Dr Foster sock and do some work on the Gaudi cardigan. Oh, and see how much exercise it will need to work off today’s mince-pie-and-cream input! I have been rather indulgent over Christmas, without going totally overboard. However, I have been very good with exercise over the days of festivity, which has to count for something, surely.


How is your knitting progressing? I’ll be back on Friday with some ink stash enhancement, then on New Year’s Eve I will post my review of my 2018 knitting projects.


 

Kojak is not knitting a sock

Kojak Sock knitting
He may look like he’s knitting a sock

I was fascinated by the appearance of hand-knitted socks in one of last week’s re-runs of Kojak (Series 4, Episode 3 – Law Dance). One of the numerous things I love about Kojak is how he is portrayed as being fascinated by everything. Most episodes see him fiddling with something – blowing bubbles in a country store, leafing through a huge book about insects, trying on the cologne left by a suspect in a hotel room – or throwing off-hand remarks that are very esoteric. I don’t know if that came totally from the writing or if some of it is input from Telly Savalas’ interpretation, but I love it.

In this particular episode it was knitted socks – the lady handed them to him to carry whilst she cleaned her glasses and throughout their conversation as they walked along a corridor he was intently studying the needles and stitches. Later in the episode there was a close-up of the socks being worked on during a courtroom scene and again Kojak was looking down at the knitting, not up at the courtroom. The knitter in me was impressed. (The socks, of course, were brown and beige – it was the 1970s after all.)

So, sadly, Kojak is not knitting socks, but rest assured if he had been, they would have been the sexiest socks in the universe.

In other knitting news, I am having a bit of a crisis over the lovely gold cardigan I am knitting. Having completed the back and one side of the front, I am suddenly wishing that I was using the wool doubled to knit a thicker jumper, inspired by this one currently on sale at Marks and Spencer:

Yellow polo neck
M&S Pullover Winter 2018

I hope it’s just a passing whim and I will be back on track with the cardigan when my super-secret Christmas knitting is finished – or started, the knitting wool delivery is so super-secret even I don’t know when it will come.

Finally, a lament – I have finished my favourite perfume. The bottle is, as my mum would have put it, a “dead man” (something that is completely used up). The perfume is Bal a Versailles by Jean Desprez and I have worn this, on and off (more off than on because it can be difficult to get hold of), since the late 1970s. I read a story recently that Elizabeth Taylor wore it during the filming of Cleopatra, and apparently after that she gifted it to Michael Jackson who wore it for the rest of his life. Eek!

Bal a Versailles
It’s a dead man….

Do you have any favourite knitting scenes from TV or film – such as Dumbledore’s famous comment about knitting patterns in the Harry Potter films? Do you ever get part of the way through knitting something and wonder if it should be something else, and do you change, or do you persevere? Do you have a favourite perfume or just chop and change as the mood hits you?


Me-time

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Boating Pond, Earlham Park, Norwich

Given that I am not doing anything truly productive with my work-time, it seems odd to say I took advantage of the weekend to be self-indulgent, but I did. It was one of those good, early-autumn weekends, cool enough to do enjoyable things and bright enough to be out and about.

On Sunday morning I walked up to a reasonably local park, mainly for exercise, but also to grab some photos. It is a nice walk there and back and the boating pond in particular is a favourite part of the park for me.

When I got home I set my “shop” knitting aside and started working on a pair of socks for myself. This was inspired by a post from Fog Knits and the pair of socks she talk about with a Fleegle Heel which somehow ate its way into my brain and made me want to try it myself. I think it’s the name more than anything – Fleegle is a super word. Anyway, I watched YouTube videos and read construction information and I knitted a trial heel and liked it. I have had two skeins of sock wool from Mr B Yarns sitting in my mum’s cut glass vase all summer and have been happily admiring them without going so far as winding them into balls and knitting with them. These socks were all the inspiration I needed. In a trice I had those two skeins wound into balls and I was casting on using the beautiful Dr Foster Went To Gloucester colourway.

Dr Foster Went to Gloucester
Dr Foster Went To Gloucester by Mr B. Yarns at Birdstreet UK

I love those pops of blue in the sands, browns and greys of this yarn. In fact, I love Mr B’s aesthetic full stop. I find that is the thing with hand dyers, they all do really impressive work, but every now and then one will particularly resonate with you. The other, equally gorgeous, skein – in the Isambard colourway – is awaiting a second pair of socks in the not-too-distant future.

Not only is this my first pair of socks with anything but a heel flap and gusset construction, they are also the first pair I have knit toe-up. I’m not 100% happy with my toe, and I need to finish the sock in order to truly determine about the fit, but so far so good. For some reason I did think that it would be quicker to knit this way than the heel flap style and, although I shouldn’t be, I am surprised that they take about the same amount of time.

I rounded off the weekend reading some Byron so I think this Friday’s quote of the week will be something in the nature of an incantation…

I hope you all enjoyed your weekends and did a little something either constructive or recuperative, whichever most suited you.

A skein of two halves

So, I start with the end; in this case a finished object.

Bright Charcoal socks ready to wear

Quite a small one, but one pair of socks completed and ready to wear.  The Colinette Jitterbug has, as usual, knitted up nicely into thick, springy socks.  I love the colourway which I think is like chalk markings on a blackboard.  Or, thus it is for one and a half socks, because my skein of yarn had a join just under half the way in and the two ends did not entirely match.

When I wound the skein into a ball, of course, I found the knot and decided at that point to make two separate balls.  I knit the first sock out of the slightly larger ball which was the second half of the skein, and the colours were nice and even throughout.  When I came to knit the second sock I started on the slightly smaller ball, which was the first half of the skein, and it was immediately apparent that there was a lot less colour in this part.

There are less colours on this part

At that point, I unpicked and rewound the ball to try working from the other end, but with the same result.  The fabric was more substantially grey than on the first sock.

However, I still had enough of the first ball left to knit down the leg of the sock, and joined in the second ball to work the heel and foot, reasoning that since that will be mainly within my shoe it won’t matter too much.  The difference can be seen comparing the soles of the socks.  It certainly seems like some colours are missing, leaving long stretches of greys broken with the pale creamy white.

Our soles – shows the difference between the two parts of the skein

I think I was unlucky to get a skein with a bit of a flaw to it, but these things happen and I am happy with the finished socks.  Most importantly, the quality of the wool is the same throughout, just the dyeing was a bit off.

Plans

I decided to make some firm plans for my knitting over the next few months.  I do this every so often when I need or want to be more productive and I certainly find it helps to set myself targets.

For the current month, I have set myself the target of knitting one pair of socks (done) and completing the grey Rimini cardigan.  I feel at the current point that this is achievable, but certainly not easy.  I have three weeks and almost a complete side of the front, two sleeves, button bands and collar to knit, plus the time for piecing it together.  Knowing how bogged down I can get with sleeves, I wonder if I have given myself too much to do, especially as I’m back at work from tomorrow so my productivity is likely to take a nosedive.

However, I am aware that I will let things drift if I don’t give myself some target to aim at – I experienced this with the Laccaria cardigan which lingered on the needles for what seemed like forever.

In the longer term, I am going to try and knit one pair of socks a month for the next few months.  I can churn out the simple, plain socks that I like fairly speedily.  I am aware that since I wear my hand knitted socks every day, there are likely to be several that bite the dust at the same time, and therefore I need to be prepared well in advance with some new ones to include in the rotation.  I’m keen on this plan because I intend to use up some of the wool I’ve got stashed for garments over the next few months and this will be much easier if I can treat myself to a skein of sock yarn each month to keep things feeling fresh.

Speaking of feeling fresh, if I intend to feel that way in the morning I’d better get myself off to bed.

Hope your knitting, or chosen field of endeavour, has gone well this Bank Holiday weekend.