Seams okay

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Now that is what I call progress!

My Cable Front Cardigan by Norah Gaughan for Vogue Knitting is coming along apace. I made it my goal to finish the back over the weekend and, despite having a totally lethargic day on Saturday (which I am putting down to the humidity), I comfortably finished it by the early part of Sunday morning. That was the point at which I decided that I could seam together the main body of the cardigan and then when the cabled scarf front is finished all I’ll have to do is add that to the body and I’ll have a finished object.

Of course, as soon as it was in the above state, I had to try it on and I have to say that if the fronts were not so narrow, I’d be tempted to just put a button band on it and call it done. I love how it fits at the moment. It is nowhere near as boxy as the initial, multi-coloured version was, although the addition of the scarf piece will change the fit and the look of the garment dramatically.

Just to clarify, I have not made a mistake with my grammar in the title of this post, it is a play on words. I thought it would be nice to show you how I seam my hand-knits. First of all, I tether the pieces I am about to seam together with loops cut from left-over sock yarn – the contrasting colours help to make things clear. The loops are usually about 3-4cm apart.

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Then I run a row of crochet along to form the seam, removing each yarn loop as I come to it.

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Yes, it’s more bulky than a nice professional invisible seam, but what it lacks in grace it more than makes up for in sturdiness and ease of finishing. The only seam I really hate doing is the shoulder seam – no matter what I do I can’t get a shoulder seam to go together easily. Mind you, they look fine once the garment is finished, so who cares?

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little look at my current work in progress. I’ve been doing a little housekeeping on my archive of finished projects over the past week and I’ve come across some more references to old knits which I want to make new versions of. Come back on Friday for more about that.

In the meantime, I hope your week is progressing well.

 

Finished object – Wheatfields Pullover

20-03-19 Wheatfield full

Well, here it is in its finished glory – the Wheatfields Sleeveless Pullover. I am really pleased with how it turned out and I think it’s a great layering piece for this time of year. I would wear this as I’ve photographed it over long-sleeved dresses or shirts when you don’t need a full-on cardigan or jumper but need a little bit of extra warmth. I really love the cream wool and I definitely need to knit something in this shade for myself – in fact, I’m pretty sure when I splurge on a kit from Virtual Yarns to knit Scapa, it’s going to be the cream version.

20-03-19 Wheatfield neck

Here’s some detail of the lace stitch and the crocheted border round the neck and armhole. I did two rows of double crochet (UK terminology) for the neckband and just a single row round the armholes. These have provided the perfect minimal edging. As to the lace pattern, it was a joy to work and I almost had it memorised after the first two or three repeats. The only rows that I had to keep consulting the pattern on were the two where you worked the top of the right-hand ear as well as the bottom of the left-hand ear and vice versa – I just couldn’t remember which way you had to work three knit stitches then four knit stitches and which was four knit stitches then three knit stitches.

I knitted this in a fairly small size and it ended up measuring 34″ round the chest. It’s just a bit tight for me which is lucky since it was knitted for sale in my Etsy shop. I used a 3.75mm needle for the main body with two strands of J C Rennie Supersoft Shetland wool held together. I think if I used 4mm needles it would be my size, but then I like the sturdiness of the wool knit at this gauge so I’m happy.

This was knitted bottom-up, in two separate pieces and seamed together as I always do, with a crochet chain. I know that I would get a better finish sewing the seams, but I would rather have a supportive visible seam than go for complete invisibility and lose some of the durability.

The back of the pullover is worked in stocking stitch and I simply whizzed through it. I do enjoy working on a nice stretch of stocking stitch and I like working the purl rows every bit as much as the knit rows, which makes me very odd in the knitting community.

20-03-19 Wheatfield back

Now this is done and up for sale, I am about to return to the Gaudi cardigan which keeps on not progressing even though I still adore it. Perhaps I am not yet quite desperate enough to wear it. One thing that is bothering me is the size; my diet has gone well, but it means some of my knits now don’t fit as well as they once did. I’m going to have a quick check to see if I am still happy with the size I am knitting before I go any further because if I’m going to have to unpick it and knit it smaller, I will be much happier to do that right now.

Whilst I knit this afternoon, I am going to watch the latest video podcast by Knitting The Stash. I find Melissa a very interesting knitter, podcaster and (very recently) yarn wizard and I highly recommend her podcast which you can find on YouTube or via her blog.

So, au revoir until Friday.


Hope your Wednesday is going fantastically well.