Finished object – Isambard Socks

15-05-19 complete socks

I had a bit of a knitting frenzy over the weekend and finished my Isambard socks. I have small feet and my socks don’t take long to knit if I work on them consistently. I love seeing all the amazing sock patterns that other people knit, but I only like knitting plain ones myself. I have no idea why that should be unless it is because I love my socks to be wildly coloured or have tons of variegation and those type of yarns just don’t play nicely with patterning. Or perhaps I am just lazy (actually, no perhaps needed there).

I have been knitting my socks for the past couple of years on 2.5mm needles, but I am coming to the conclusion that I might go down to 2.25mm for my next pair. I think I used 2.25mm when I first started knitting socks and they lasted rather better than my more recent socks, not that the more recent socks are problematic in any way.

I really enjoy how this wool knits up and the dyeing is very pleasing to the eye. Those blues and golds on the grey-beige background make me very happy.

Technical details:

Pattern:  Vanilla sock based on free pattern circa 2006/2007, came free with a ball of sock wool
Size: To fit UK size 4 1/2 shoe
Materials: Mr B sock yarn 75% superwash wool/25% nylon, 100g (I usually use around 55g)
Needles:  2.5mm KnitPro Zing metal double-point needles, 20cm long, pack of 5 (I use 4 with half the stitches on one needle, and a quarter each on a further two needles, working the live stitches onto the fourth needle)

The pattern I follow has a heel flap and gusset construction which suits me very well. The toe in the pattern is pretty standard, decreasing equal amounts on both sides until 12 stitches remain on both needles, then doing a Kitchener Stitch join. I learned how to do the Kitchener join using the knitting needles instead of having to thread up a tapestry needle and that made a lot of sense to me. However, last year I discovered the Barn Toe which gives a slightly deeper and more rounded toe shape and I like that a lot so I used it on this pair.

15-05-19 barn toe

I particularly enjoy the fact that with this toe shaping you just keep decreasing until you only have four stitches left and then you cinch them shut using the end of your working yarn. It is so quick to do and there’s none of that inclination to stop just short of the end because you need to look up the Kitchener instructions again.

As well as finishing these, I have made significant progress on my Inigo cardigan. I have all-but completed the back and have made a start on one of the sleeves. I thought, as my gauge is not exactly as per the pattern, it made sense to wait to finish the armhole shaping on the back until I had a sleeve complete so I can make sure that the pieces fit together well. Forethought – that’s a new one for me!

Whilst I was working on the Gaudi cardigan I logged it on Ravelry. I have been very lazy about Ravelry for quite a number of years, rarely using it and not logging any of my projects, although there was a time when I was quite diligent with it. Now I am suddenly getting back into using it to keep the project details and I am enjoying it once again.

There has been one drawback to my knitting endeavours this past week, which is that one of my fingers has developed a slightly alarming ‘click’. I have consulted Dr. Internet who informs me this is “trigger finger” (sounds like it is a surfeit of Kojak rather than knitting that has caused it) and since I am not in pain and my finger merely feels odd rather than actually seizing up, I am limiting the amount I work on my knitting for a few days to give it a rest.

I hope you have enjoyed seeing my finished socks and I hope your knitting, or other creative endeavours, are going well. For now, I think it’s time to have a nice cup of tea.


 

Knits in progress as December wanes

Hello again, nice to have you back with me for an update on my current knits. I am not being a monogamous knitter at the moment, which is rather out of character as you know. I must admit this causes me a tiny bit of concern as I don’t think I will make progress on everything and I hate to leave things in abeyance.

The “old gold” wool

You may recall before Christmas I was having a dither over whether to continue knitting the Rimini cardigan by Martin Storey with this 4-ply yarn, or to abandon that and knit a thicker jumper holding two or three stands of yarn together. Well, I tried a thicker jumper and didn’t really like it so I reverted to the fine-knit cardigan which I know I will wear. However, what with the Christmas knitting and the dithering, it was clear I would not be finishing the project before Christmas so I decided to put it on hold, probably until the spring.

The “Dr Foster Went To Gloucester” socks

Another thing you may recall is that I knitted one sock out of this lovely Mr B Yarns wool back in September. I went completely out of my comfort zone and knitted it toe-up, incorporating the delightfully-titled Fleegle Heel and was very happy with it at the time, and in no doubt that I would knit the other sock when I’d finished… (insert whatever seems appropriate!).

I didn’t ever knit that second sock, but I thought knitting it would be the ideal project to fill in the time before I did my Christmas cast-on of the project I really wanted to work on. However, as soon as I tried on the sock I’d finished, I knew I wasn’t going to complete them. I had reverted to type and was dreadfully unhappy with everything about the toe-up construction. Luckily, I have small feet, and one 100g skein of yarn can more than adequately provide me with three socks, so I simply cast on a relatively plain, cuff-down sock. I experimented with the idea of doing a short row heel rather than my normal heel flap and gusset, but after two attempts I gave up on that too and went with what makes me happy.  So here is my progress to date – a HO:-

28-12-18 Dr Foster HO
Dr Foster Went To Gloucester – still love this colourway

I have decided these will be my New Year Socks, so I had better get the second one knitted over this weekend.

The Gaudi caridgan by Martin Storey

I had promised myself through December that I would cast on for the Gaudi cardigan once my pre-Christmas socialising was done and so I sat down in the calm of Christmas Eve and made a start. This is how far I have got – to the waist of the back:-

28-12-18 Gaudi progress
Halfway up the back of the Gaudi cardigan

I love this pattern so much. I love the colours and the fact they change regularly makes for a more interesting knit. The only thing I don’t like quite so much is the Rowan Felted Tweed wool. Oh, I love how it looks, I just don’t like the fact that it incorporates alpaca. I am not a fan of alpaca and every time I use it, I experience a twinge of regret. A nice Shetland wool would give the same look and, in my opinion, a much nicer knitting experience, so I will note that for my future edification.

Not that I’m going to allow that little carp to put me off this project! I intend to make steady progress on this garment and get it finished quickly enough to keep me warm through February and March which are often the colder months in my part of the world. I reckon so long as I do a few rows each day, it will be done before I know it! Shame that I completely failed to do a few rows yesterday (my excuse is that I had some work to do on an item for my Etsy shop and that was more important).

Today

So, for today my plan is to cast on the second Dr Foster sock and do some work on the Gaudi cardigan. Oh, and see how much exercise it will need to work off today’s mince-pie-and-cream input! I have been rather indulgent over Christmas, without going totally overboard. However, I have been very good with exercise over the days of festivity, which has to count for something, surely.


How is your knitting progressing? I’ll be back on Friday with some ink stash enhancement, then on New Year’s Eve I will post my review of my 2018 knitting projects.