Finished object – Inigo Cardigan

19-06-19 Inigo c1

Last week I wrote that I wasn’t going to push myself to complete my knitting, but it turns out I did! My Inigo Cardigan is done and I am almost entirely enchanted by it.

Technical details:

Pattern:  Inigo by Lisa Richardson
Source:  Rowan UK pattern brochure “New Vintage DK” published 2018
Size: To fit bust 32-34″/81-86cm
Materials:  Sublime Yarns Luxurious Tweed DK (discontinued), 60% wool/40% cotton
Needles:  4mm KnitPro Symfonie wood straight needles, 30cm long

The pattern is very well written and explained everything you needed to do very logically. There were a couple of places where I didn’t read it carefully enough, but I can’t blame the designer for my lack of attention. This project is knit in separate pieces and seamed together, which is my preference, but I know it is off-putting for a number of knitters.

19-06-19 Inigo c3

The yarn was surprisingly pleasant to work with and I would say improved slightly when I put the garment through its post-completion wash, dry and pressing. I don’t generally like cotton, but this combination of 60% wool with 40% cotton seems to yield a very nice fabric that doesn’t take too long to dry and feels summery, but still holds shape.

Speaking of shape, I must address the one thing I’m not so happy about with the finished garment and that is the gapping where the fronts meet. I think this is caused by three factors coinciding:

a)  I could do to be five pounds lighter than I am!

b) The front bands are knitted together with the body on the 4mm needles and are therefore not quite as firm as I would like them to be; I think it would be better if the were knitted on a smaller needle to give a tighter gauge, or crocheted.

c)  There are only five buttons; the gapping would be reduced or eliminated if there were more.

19-06-19 Inigo c2

When I had finished the knitting and seamed the pieces together, I searched through my button box for suitable buttons. I decided on the silver ones because I feel the shape of the cardigan coupled with the tweedy yarn lends this garment a slightly Chanelesque air and metal buttons suit this very well.

I am sure I will revisit this pattern, probably knitting a version in wool and addressing the closure issue. However, I love this version and will enjoy wearing it. It is a really strong entry into my spring and summer wardrobe. I wasn’t too sure how many balls of the yarn I started off with (13, 14, 15?), but I have enough left over to make a little sleeveless top at some point.

But, wait, that’s not all the knitting news! I have started the Norah Gaughan Vogue Cabled Cardigan.

19-06-19 NGVCC p1

I have completed two sleeves! I can’t believe how quickly this is knitting up. I love working on it and it feels so good to finally have a project I know I will complete using the old gold Sirdar Country Style yarn. This will be the second project in a row where the yarn has been donated to me when friends and family have been de-stashing. I have been listening to my collection of Blake’s 7 audio books from Big Finish whilst knitting. There are a lot of excellent stories on these CDs and they are just the job for long stretches of stocking stitch with no shaping, which makes up the majority of this pattern. When, in the fullness of time, I move on to the cabled ‘scarf’ part of the pattern I shall need to concentrate fully and that’s when I will need complete silence.

I hope your knitting is coming on apace.

Growth spurt

12-06-19 progress

This week I have been nursing a head-cold, but that has spurred me on to put in quite a bit of work on the Inigo cardigan by Lisa Richardson from Rowan’s New Vintage DK pattern book.

So, this week I have completed the second sleeve and the first front, and by my calculations I am now 85% of the way through the project. I like that the front bands are knitted in with the main body piece so there will be minimal finishing needed on this project. In fact, if I were to work on it as much as I have the past couple of days I would have it finished by the end of this week, but I am not going to put that much pressure on myself because there are more important things to be attended to than completing this cardigan. However, I am happy to think that I’ll have it in my wardrobe by the end of this month.

This pattern is nice and easy to follow, and every step is well-explained, provided you are happy with following standard instructions for garments knit in pieces. I therefore have to wonder why I have spent so much time unpicking what I’ve knitted. I am going to blame the germs, but it may well be that I just haven’t been thinking about what I’m doing. I cast on the wrong number of stitches for the front, and got through the waist shaping decreases before I realised and even when that happened I was utterly sure I had cast on the correct number and double-checked. Then when I started shaping the neckline decreases I did them at the wrong rate because I didn’t bother to read the instructions carefully enough. Still, all’s well that ends well, as Shakespeare would have it.

I am looking forward to seeing how this fabric washes and wears because it’s the first time I’ve worked with a wool and cotton combination yarn. In my opinion it is nicer to work with than a pure cotton yarn, but not as nice as a pure wool yarn.

Once this is finished I will either cast on for my next big project – the Cable Front Cardigan – or just carry on with the Mama Weer All Crazee Cowl. The weather will play a big part in which way I go, because I can’t imagine I will want to work with worsted weight yarn if it’s hot, however much I will crave the finished project come autumn.

I hope your knitting is going well, and I hope that wherever you are in the world your weather is slightly more seasonal than our current dull, rainy, slightly chilly weather is.

New on the needles

08-05-19 apple pie
Is it an alien planet? No, it’s an apple pie!

It is a miserable day in Norfolk today with a curtain of rain plunging down from a sky that hasn’t had the heart to brighten for one moment since dawn. The kind of day when you just need to sit on the settee with your knitting and only get up to bake apple pie. I usually make pie in a deeper dish, but decided to go for what my mum would call a ‘plate apple pie’ and jolly good it is too. I think it would only be improved if I had a Lego astronaut that I could pose on top to pretend it was a photo of an alien planet.

I had a couple of days not knitting when I finished Gaudi and then I cast on a pair of socks as a quick palate-cleanser before heading into another garment. I had a ball of Mr B Yarns’ sock wool in the colourway Isambard ready to go and I got a reasonable amount of the first sock knitted before being hit with the urge to knit another cardigan. The sock is my usual plain vanilla on 60 stitches using 2.5mm needles.

08-05-19 on needles
Vanilla sock, and the beginning of Inigo by Lisa Richardson

The cardigan is Inigo, a design by Lisa Richardson for Rowan Yarns from the New Vintage DK pattern book, just like the Gaudi cardigan. When I bought the book at the tail end of last year, I knew there were a number of garments I wanted to make from it. This pattern is designed using Rowan Cashmere Tweed, but I am using Sublime Luxurious Tweed DK which is a departure for me because it is a mix of 60% wool and 40% cotton. I think this will make a nice summer cardigan with the cotton content whilst the wool makes it more comfortable to work with than a lot of cotton yarns.

I am currently at the point where I will start to increase stitches from the waist to bust, but it hasn’t been a smooth ride getting here. I am going to confess that I didn’t knit a gauge swatch, just went straight into the garment cold in a yarn I have never used before because clearly my life isn’t exciting enough! I cast on using the recommended 4mm needles and the second-smallest size (91-97cm/36-38″ bust). When I finished the moss stitch hem I thought it looked wider than I would want, so I unpicked it and started again on the smallest size (81-86cm/32-34″ bust). I knitted about 4″ on that then measured my gauge and found I was getting 20 stitches to 10cm where the pattern calls for 22 stitches. I really liked the fabric at that gauge, and enjoyed actually knitting it, but I decided to start over again knitting the second-smallest size with 3.75mm needles to see how that would go. I got to the end of the decreases into the waist on that attempt, but found even one size smaller needles made the knitting much tougher on the hands and I wasn’t quite so keen on the slightly denser fabric it produced.. I would have persevered with it, but I had somehow lost a stitch in the decreasing and couldn’t find where I had made my mistake. That was enough to convince me to return to the original plan to make the smallest size on the 4mm needles and I am glad I did. What you see in the photos has all been knitted today so it is going pretty quickly.

08-05-19 close-up

I really like the pattern for this little jacket-style cardigan, plain and simple it will be just the thing to pull on through the summer. I don’t think I have knitted any of Lisa Richardson’s patterns before, but I have often seen her designs in the Rowan magazines and long been a fan of her design aesthetic which often leans slightly towards the vintage.

I hope you have better weather than us today and, if not, that you have been able to spend a little time doing something you love to bring a little cheer to the gloom.


Many thanks to my sister for donating the lovely Sublime yarn to me when she was de-stashing.