A weekend chez moi

18-02-19 Pretty Norwich
How pretty was my city?

Good morning, my friends. I think today I am going to do a general round-up of things that I did over the weekend. Firstly, though, just how pretty does Norwich look with its wonderful watercolour sky?

On Saturday, I visited the Norfolk Makers’ Festival with one of my best friends who is also a very talented knitter, photographer and jewellery-maker. The Makers’ Festival is a celebration of local artisans and an opportunity for everyone to get involved and try out things they may never have done before. Some items are on sale, but that is not the main focus of the event. There are also lots of displays of creative items, including an entire knitted reproduction of the Golden Mile at Yarmouth in the 1970s – quite a sight! Two of my favourite works were the Poppy Curtain and the Suffrage Quilt.

My friend pointed out that it is very encouraging to see not only so many people at the event, but the number of young people having a go at a whole variety of different crafts. It certainly seems to grip the imagination every bit as much as the modern technologies.

18-02-19 Chopstick Spin
Gateway drug….

Whilst at the Festival, I decided to buy a little introductory Chopstick Spinning Kit. I have long been sitting on the fence about spinning; in some ways it intrigues me, but I feel it has the potential to just add clutter to my life without being something I really love to do. This kit seems the ideal way to try it out with very minimal investment just to determine whether it interests me enough to warrant putting time and money into practising it. Although it is quite limited, this kit is ideal to introduce the concept of adding twist to fibre, pinching it, allowing the twist to travel into the next part of the fibre, and plying the strand to make a length of yarn. After only a few hours playing with this, I can confidently predict that there will be a drop-spindle in my life in the very near future. It has also occurred to me that I will prefer to spin dyed bumps of fibre to natural fleece because you know me and colour – I am far more likely to want to keep spinning if there’s pretty effects happening as I go along.

The Festival runs until Sunday 24th February 2019 and I would highly recommend a visit if you are in or around Norwich this week.

18-02-19 Norfolk Makers
Love the irregular Granny Squares making up these blankets/hangings

I think that visit has led me to have a number of crafty thoughts throughout the weekend, and to clarify some things that I have been pondering for a while now. That hopefully means there will be some different items making their way into my very static Etsy shop between now and Easter. Prototypes need to be worked on.

By comparison, Sunday was a quiet day for me, just some knitting, some letter-writing (InCoWriMo is going very well this year, I am happy to report), quite a lot of Starsky and Hutch, and a portion of Christmas Pudding and Rum Sauce for my tea. I am so glad I decided to make a full batch of Christmas Pudding mix last year and freeze six portions to eat when I had a yen for it.

I hope you have all had a lovely weekend and that you manage to do some fun things through the week too.


 

InCoWriMo 2019

Today is the sixth day of the International Correspondence Writing Month 2019 and I am pleased with my progress to date.

Whilst the aim is to write a letter – or, indeed, any hand-written missive which can be a note, postcard, post-it, so long as it’s written by hand – every day through February, many people taking part will inevitably be fans of pens and papers and so the letters can be quite decorative, or include little gifts. I like to write in my letters about which pen and ink I am using because I love to read this information in the letters I receive. I have some decorative notepaper, quite a bit of it from Kikki K, so I don’t decorate the letters themselves, but I do like to add some fripperies on the envelopes.

Speaking of envelopes, I am addressing the letters this year with my lovely little typewriter. One year I hand-wrote the addresses with fountain pen and ink and then overlaid them with sellotape to provide a waterproof layer; the other year I hand-wrote the envelopes with ballpoint pen. Of the three, the typewriter is the nicest – it still seems like a hand-crafted solution, whilst being neat, legible, and waterproof.

For letters that I am sending abroad, I have a pack of postcards from Norwich Castle Museum. These feature images from the Norwich School of painters, mostly local scenes or still-lives. Many of these hang in the Castle Museum itself as it houses a good art gallery as well as the historical and natural displays.

The little bone-handle pen-knife in my picture above is an item I use for opening letters. To the best of my knowledge, it belonged to my grandparents when they lived in their lovely house in York, and passed along via my mum to me. It is a delicate item, very much for the genteel lady. My dad always carried a pen-knife which my sister now owns. It was mainly used for peeling apples, sharpening pencils, and for tamping down the tobacco in his pipe. I find it sad that the pen-knife is now seen as a weapon rather than a utility item, and is therefore (understandably) frowned-upon.

In other news, yesterday was my birthday and it was very book-orientated. 2019 is definitely going to be a year where I read a lot. I have already determined that I am going to get back into the habit of just browsing in bookshops. It seems to me that I stopped reading a lot at around the time when I stopped browsing in bookshops a lot; I am not sure which one led to the other. However, it does seem to me that when I take the time to simply wander around and look at books, I see all manner of items which catch my eye and I am certain that this can only be of help to me in my desire to read more. My favourite bookshop to browse in was a small independent book store in Norwich called Gliddons which was around until the 1980s. I remember buying my first copies of books by John Fowles, Elizabeth Jane Howard, and F Scott Fitzgerald there, as well as many a sci-fi book from the bookshelves in the basement. Second to that, the big Borders store which opened in Chapelfield in 2005 and sadly departed in 2009, was a favourite. This was a huge book shop for Norwich and I can remember buying many a ‘business’ book there, as well as the first paperbacks I owned of Haruki Murakami novels. The best shops for browsing the books in Norwich now are The Book Hut (independent), Jarrolds (independent, part of local department store) and Waterstones (chain).

Right, I am heading off to clean out a fountain pen then tomorrow I can refill it with a new colour ink, ready for some more letters.


Are you taking part in InCoWriMo this year? Have you done it in previous years? Would you do it in future years? What do you think?


 

A weekend in review

Continuing with my slightly tardy theme, today I’m going to write about the various elements of my weekend.

On Saturday I went to a meeting of the Castle Writers Group at the Castle Museum, Norwich. This is a monthly meet-up that has been going on for many months now, but this is the first month that I have steeled myself and booked to join in. Now I regret not doing it sooner because it was brilliant. We spent two and a half hours exporing character including picking a face to write about – I chose the gentleman in the beret in the photos above; he has really gripped me. I waver between whether he is quite military, or bohemian. Either way, I adore him.

The meeting was quite structured and I really enjoyed the format. It was very much geared towards getting us thinking about a specific element of our creative writing and provided much food for thought and practice before the next meeting.

The desk in the photo montage is on display in the museum and it represents a typical curator’s desk. It is one of the pieces I always go and look at whenever I visit the museum because I find it very inspiring.

In the evening I had a meal at Yo! Sushi with my daughter, son-in-law, and grandson. It was a really enjoyable meal with good food and good company. The food going round on conveyor belts is guaranteed to entertain young and old alike. When we left the restaurant Norwich was having one of its very few wintery showers. We have only had one real snow shower this winter and even then it didn’t linger, otherwise just a few sharp frosts and a couple of bouts of sleet.

On Sunday morning I sat and finished reading Haruki Murakami’s latest novel, Killing Commendatore, a thoroughly enjoyable read.┬áIt is a reasonably long novel at around 680 pages of medium-sized text and I didn’t exactly speed through it, although I did read for longer periods from about halfway through. Murakami’s works are usually told from the point of view of a single character and this is no exception. Our hero is an artist, in the process of divorcing from his wife and settling into a house owned by the father of his friend and agent, Masahiko Amada, after spending the winter on an extended road trip. Masahiko’s father is Tomohiko Amada, a renowned artist who has worked in the Japanese tradition since he returned to Japan just before the second world war. He is suffering from dementia and is living out his final days in a nursing home. Three things happen which combine to catapault our leading man into an increasingly surreal landscape, and which also act as a catalyst for his personal art. He discovers an unknown painting by Tomohiko Amada, he makes the acquaintance of a man who lives on the opposite side of the valley – the strangely charismatic and possibly dangerous Menshiki, and he discovers a pit in the garden of Amada’s house. From these three events, all manner of inexplicable tendrils branch out; some things are resolved by the end of the novel, but by no means all of the questions asked get answered.

I am going to include one quote from the novel, simply because it made me laugh when I read it. It concerns Menshiki, who is a bit of a Gatsby-type figure, and who has cooked our hero an omelette.

The omelette wasn’t just pretty to look at – it was delicious.
“This omelette is perfection,” I said.
Menshiki laughed. “Not really. I’ve made better.”
What sort of omelette could that have been? One that sprouted wings and flew from Tokyo to Osaka in under two hours?

Also on Sunday, I made a batch of Date Slices – shown in my photo prior to cutting. Actually, I could so easily just have left it in one piece and gobbled my way through it, but I really made it for sharing. I love Date Slices and bake them to a recipe from Cranks, the wholefood restaurant.

Of course, Friday 1st February marked the beginning of the International Correspondence Writing Month and so I wrote letters on Saturday and Sunday. So far I have written and posted a letter a day, which is the object of the exercise. I hope this year I can make it through the whole month because last year I failed miserably. In fact, I got so far behind I just gave up.

The thing I didn’t do so much of is knitting, and I do find that if I get immersed in reading something the knitting tends to lag behind, and if I get immersed in my knitting the reading lags. I wonder if I am using the same part of my brain for both, so either ones satisfies the urges?

I hope you had a good weekend, and have been reading, writing, knitting, or doing other things entirely, but all to you own heart’s content.