Revelation

Wroxham Broad
Wroxham Broad

The list of things I haven’t done the past week is enormous. I haven’t exercised anywhere near enough. I haven’t been faithful to my diet. I haven’t finished reading Midnight At The Well Of Souls (by Jack L Chalker, thrilling 1970s sci-fi). Indeed, for the past three days I haven’t even written or knitted. Instead I have done more important things, more urgent things, and more fun things. Unfortunately, none of them are the stuff that stories are made of. So, instead of writing about progress, I’m going to present you with a small revelation.

One of my favourite poems is Maud by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. For many years I have loved the part which became the popular Edwardian song, Come Into The Garden, Maud. I am also very keen on the section that John Fowles quoted in The French Lieutenant’s Woman. So it is unfathomable to me that I have never actually read the entire poem.

It shouldn’t really be a surprise because it is a long poem and the readibility is patchy; the bits I know are probably the highlights. However, I have decided that I owe it to myself to read it through just once, and so last week I started from the beginning, which is sombre in mood as the narrator relates how he dislikes a particular part of the wood where his father had fallen once to his death. It is very evocative and draws the reader in as all good beginnings should.

The poet is considering whether it would be best to leave his childhood home when news reaches him:

“Workmen up at the Hall! – they are coming back from abroad;
The dark old place will be gilt by the touch of a millionaire:
I have heard, I know not whence, of the singular beauty of Maud;
I play’d with the girl when a child; she promised then to be fair.”

Things creep up on us in just that way, and we cannot know whether the future will be delight or pain, all we can do is walk forwards and live it.

I am looking forward to this poem being my future companion for a while.

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Pamela Boxall

A highly imaginative approach to literature (and to life in general) can lead to imprecision.

2 thoughts on “Revelation”

  1. Interesting ( well, to me anyway!) that I was watching Last of the Mohicans (the not good 1977 version!) and found myself thinking I should read Hiawatha again, not done since we read it as children, I seem to recall a book which must have started out with the first child, our brother, and carried on through the 4 of us. I also thought I must watch the TV series of Last of the Mohicans with the wonderful Philip Madoc as Magua.

  2. Ah, yes, Longfellow. Good idea to read it again. Your comment about the TV series of Last of the Mohicans had me searching because I feel like I had it on DVD, but apparently not. Perhaps I searched for it, but couldn’t find it on sale anywhere.

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